Inspiring Interfaith Stories:

Jews & Muslims Help Each Other

Through Trying Times

This is the first in a series of interfaith stories about Jews and Muslims working together to combat religious prejudice.  In the process of sharing our faith, fears and lives, many of us become friends.

Islamophobia and Anti-Semitism have risen dramatically during the last year.    Many American Muslims are frightened to leave their homes, fearful of being subject to verbal abuse and possibly physical violence.  Many Jewish community centers around the country have been threatened.  Yet through this fog, a beautiful interfaith connection is emerging.

“There has been an incredible coming together of synagogues around the country to welcome Muslim refugees. Jews really understand what it is to be ‘the other,'” said Rabbi Jennie Rosen,Vice President for Community Engagement of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society. Muslims are helping Jews in our time of need as well.

Here is a moving story about a Muslim woman who started a fundraising campaign to repair and reset more than 150 plus tombstones that were vandalized in a Jewish Cemetery in St. Louis. Her goal was to raise $20,000.  That goal was reached in hours.  As of the writing of this blog, the total amount of funds raised stands at $64,000.  Any money not used in this cemetery will go to other Jewish cemeteries that need repair.  To read the entire Washington Post story, click on the link below.

‘Every person deserves to rest in peace’: American Muslims raising money to repair vandalized Jewish cemetery

Interfaith Stories - Jewish Cemetery Vandalized in St. Louis
An American flag still stands next to one of more than 170 toppled Jewish headstones after a weekend vandalism attack on Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, a suburb of St Louis, Mo., on Feb. 21. (Tom Gannam/Reuters)

“Classical Reform Judaism upholds the Prophetic vision that calls us to active engagement in the struggle for peace and social justice for all people, which has always inspired Reform Judaism.”  To learn more about Classical Reform Judaism, go to Classical Reform Principles, and A Concise Profile.